I see pineapples

June 20, 2016

Remember that time I gushed all over all things southern?  If you don’t, you can catch yourself up here to better understand my love affair with the south.  While honeymooning with #3 in Charleston and Savannah, I noticed a plethora of pineapples.  Pineapple flags hung on porches and peered out front room windows.  Plaster pineapples were focal points in archways while those of the copper and concrete variety sat atop fences, walls, and garden gates.  They welcomed you on doormats, knockers, and address plates.  And for those of you who haven’t noticed, there is a brilliant and beautiful pineapple fountain centered in Charleston’s famous Waterfront park.  I was both fascinated and smitten with the abundance and repetition of this delectable fruit.  Thanks to modern technology and Google, I quickly educated myself on the historical relevance of the Pineapple in Colonial America.

From what I found, good ol’ Chris Columbus brought pineapple back with him from the new world.  Europeans desperately tried to grow this fruit but could only do so successfully using greenhouse methods.  Due to the lack of abundance, only the affluent households could afford pineapple and offer it to their guests thereby making the pineapple a symbol of generosity, wealth, and hospitality.  As with all things rare, coveted, and expensive, the pineapple found its way into American architecture.  Pineapples were sculpted into wood and stone and could be seen both on the exterior façade and internal surfaces of expensive buildings and churches. Read More

Today

Schools out for my little people.  Which is equally awesome and chaotic.  There’s all this running about to summer and football camps and babysitters leaving on vacations and all of the ways that we attempt to keep kids active, entertained, and useful all summer long.  So I feel a little disconnected from my second life as a would be blogger.  When I started blogging, it was initially a place for the journaling that I began during what I thought was just recovery of an eating disorder.  A few months into that process, I recognized (through the help of costly professionals) that my behaviors were more of a symptom of issues rather than *the* issue itself.  Ultimately it became evident to myself and probably anyone around me that I really needed to work through something greater. Read More

A really incomplete backstory.

September 22, 2015

Yesterday was my weekly counseling session.  Now that she’s stopped wanting to choke me out because of my utterly screwed up view of appropriate meal planning, we’re discussing my “trauma”.  I’ve always viewed my trials and mistakes (mostly my inarguable poor taste in men) as really unfortunate luck or consequences of my equally unfortunate decisions.  But it’s through this process, my individual counseling and group meetings, that I’m beginning to think that maybe there is some value in grieving these losses.  Because that’s what a divorce is right, a loss?  The death of a marriage and family and a life that you knew as well as the future you had prepared for and dreamed of. Read More